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Dr. David W. Goodman “Ask the Expert” Webinar for the National Resource Center for ADHD, “The Representation of ADHD in the Media”


On February 5, 2014 Wednesday at 3:00pm, I will be providing a webinar on “The Representation of ADHD in the Media”. The webinar is sponsored by the National Resource Center for ADHD, supported by a grant for the Centers of Disease Control. The topic was chosen after a number of recent articles on ADHD in national publications. Given my media experience, I was invited to provide an educational overview to how articles are developed, discerning the subtext, and advocating for input for those who deal with ADHD everyday.

I hope to provide the participants with a “behind the curtain” insight to the positive and negative representations in local and national press. My presentation with slides will be 25 minutes followed by 30 minutes of Q and A. Please join us.

You may wish to view transcripts of previous “Ask the Experts” presentations by leading experts. This is a treasure trove of information.

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WYPR interview on ADHD with Dr. David W. Goodman


My discussion with Dale Archer, M.D. (psychiatrist, best-selling author) on WYPR September 27, 2014 about ADHD, over- diagnosis, and  over-prescribed medications was lively. While Dr. Archer advocates “medication as a last resort” and “the goal of treatment is to get off medication” after learning new skills, I offered the research on medication benefit and a quality of life measure to evaluate medication utility. Certainly, treatment of ADHD at all ages incorporates behavioral therapy, organization skills, couple/family/individual therapies, and academic/occupational accommodations, in addition to medication, when indicated.

For those of you interested, the radio broadcast is available and runs 35 minutes. I invite you to listen and decide for yourself the merits of each position. Ultimately, this information best serves those who have ADHD and their families.

 

Dr. Goodman interview on Dan Rodricks show on WYPR Jan 27 at 1pm


I have been invited as an expert on ADHD to participate in an interview on the Mid-day with Dan Rodricks show on WYPR on January 27 1-2pm. This is a live panel discussion that will include Dale Archer M.D., a psychiatrist and writer, to discuss the use of medication and treatment options for ADHD. The discussion is moderated by Dan Rodricks who is a distinguished journalist in Baltimore with a regular feature in the Baltimore Sun newspaper.

Dr. Archer wrote an article online for Forbes on January 6, 2014 on his perspective of ADHD and the overuse of medication and the over-marketing of ADHD. His article highlights and echoes the sentiments of Alan Schwatz in his New York Times article “The Selling of Attention Deficit Disorder” published December 15, 2013.

This one-hour program will give me the opportunity to highlight the national and international  scientific literature and research on ADHD. I hope to highlight the  well documented negative consequences over the course of one’s life with untreated ADHD as reflected in several international prospective studies following ADHD children into young adulthood.

This program promises to be a lively discussion and offers listeners the opportunity to call in with questions.  I encourage you to mark your calendar. I believe the program can be accessed online. If you listen, please leave me your comments for feedback.

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Brain wave device for ADHD approved by the FDA


If you get ADHD alerts or listen to the media, you may have heard of the FDA approval for a brain wave test to aid in the diagnosis of ADHD. The study involved 275  children between ages 6-17. The test is an EEG and they say that the ratio of specific brain waves (theta and delta) increase the accuracy of making the ADHD diagnosis.

Here are my reservations:

1. The FDA has not released the study data so there is no way for researchers and clinicians to review the merits of the study.

2. Study methodology can strongly influence the data and subsequent interpretation.

3. We don’t know the threshold of benefit that was used by the FDA to merit the approval. The threshold was not indicated in their approval statement.

4. I’m unable to locate the study as a scientific publication at the NIH publication database (www.pubmed.com)

5. What you may be reading in the media is simply a combination of the FDA’s statement of their approval and the press releases by the company who sought the approval.

6. Historically, attempts to find diagnostic tests like this for ADHD have been very elusive and ultimately of little added benefit in clinician practice.

7. Resist the “sales” pitch of practitioners to use and bill for this “test”. The prescribed treatment will still be the same, regardless of the “test” results.

Until the study or studies are publically available for scientific review, please be skeptical.  If it proves to useful, the studies will clearly indicate it.  Until then…..

David W. Goodman, M.D.

Adult ADHD on Sirius XM Doctors Radio October 16 Tues 8:00 am


Doctors Radio on Sirius XM satellite radio will feature me in a one hour live interview with Dr. Carol Burnstein, past president for the American Psychiatric Association. The topic, “Updating physicians on diagnosis and treatment of ADHD, especially in adults”. I apologize for the late notice but the time was only confirmed today.

With a full hour, I hope to cover a broad range of physicians concerns about identifying, diagnosing and effectively treating ADHD. In adults the complexity increases because of co-existing psychiatric and medical conditions. As physicians, we can consider the implication of neurodevelopment in assisting diagnostic evaluation. Also, medical illnesses need to be considered as some medical conditions may mimic attention problems (ie sleep apnea, hypothyroidism, medication effects). Since medications are often prescribed, a medical assessment of safety risk (cardiac, drug interactions, over-the-counter medications, daily caffeine intake, substance abuse history) is an important component of the initial evaluation. The complement of individualized psychotherapies expands the new skills needed by people with ADHD and their families.

I am pleased and honored that the producer has invited me, now the second time, to review the state of new research and its clinical applicability.

David W. Goodman, M.D.