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Archive for December, 2013

“The Selling of Attention Deficit Disorder” The New York Times December 15, 2013


The New York Times article “The Selling of Attention Deficit Disorder” published December 15, 2013 had quoted me towards the end of article. As I had previously written in my blog posting, the quote was taken out of context and deliberately misrepresented my professional article with Medscape. I did send a letter to the editor in order to have this quote placed in appropriate context, however, in the letters to the editor, it went unpublished. So, I’ve posted my letter to The New York Times here.

The New York Times

Letter to the Editor

December 14, 2013

Dear Editor:

Let me congratulate Alan Schwartz on his extensive review of ADHD in his article “The Selling of Attention Deficit Disorder”, December 14, 2013.  He highlights the increased identification of people with ADHD and the growing use of medication as a treatment option. Unfortunately, he presents information that malign physicians and researchers who have committed their life’s work to investigating the causes of ADHD and pursuing research to prove treatments effective. Mr. Swartz would have served his readers well by revealing his a priori agenda in writing this article. A case in point, Mr. Schwartz quotes me in regards to an article I authored for Medscape on adult ADHD. In this article, he knowingly and deliberately eliminated my notation that the six-minute video accompanied a 2000 word article with 86 scientific references that extensively detailed the clinical evaluation process for ADHD in adults.  Therefore my quote, out of context, misrepresents my work and misleads your readers.  Perhaps his article would have been better placed in the Op-Ed section of The New York Times.

David W. Goodman, M.D.

The moral: Discern the agenda of the journalist before you make sense of the information provided. As I like to teach my psychiatric residents at Johns Hopkins, the credibility of the information is a function of the intent of the provider.

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Elected to the Board of Directors of American Professional Society of ADHD and Related Disorders


The American Professional Society of ADHD and Related Disorders is an organization of national and international researchers and clinicians. I was honored to be invited to present “Adult ADHD and Medication Treatment Options” at the annual conference held in Washington, DC in September 2013.  During the conference, I was nominated and elected to the Board of Directors consisting of 15 experts from around the world. This is an opportunity for me to directly participate with the international community of experts and assist in disseminating the state-of-the-art research and clinical treatments. In addition, I will provide assistance in the pre-publication peer review process for the Journal of Attention Disorders.

I look forward to making my contributions on behalf of all the people with ADHD and their families. Thank you for your interest.

David W. Goodman, M.D.

Dr. David W. Goodman featured as ADHD expert in The Washington Post article’s December 17, 2013


The Washington Post took the initiative to write an article in today’s (December 17) paper on ADHD in adults ages sixty and older. This article is also accompanied by a sidebar article discussing adult ADHD Older adults with ADHD are a group that has not been specifically researched and about whom very little is written. The Washington Post article includes two or three people with ADHD who were diagnosed much later in life. They speak about their lifetime experiences with untreated ADHD and the positive change they and others have noticed with treatment.

Imagine that you spent 60 years of your life distracted, disorganized, forgetful, and chronically tardy.  Imagine that you have dropped out of school, lost jobs, or were divorced as a direct consequence of that state of mind.  Imagine that you seek help from  a professional and you are told that you have a disorder that can be effectively treated.  Imagine your reluctance and hopefulness that these experiences can diminish. Imagine that you agree to treatment and discover that all of these experiences were symptoms of the disorder and not you as a person.  I know, that’s a lot to imagine. At this age, the goal of treatment is not only to treat ADHD  but to help a person understand the difference between what they have (disorder) versus who they are (person).  In my experience helping people, this process helps resurrect a person’s self-image.

I invite you to read these two articles and seek professional help if these  symptoms resonate with your experience. If you are an older adult with possible ADHD, I recommend that you see an expert in ADHD who will be able to make an accurate diagnosis. Because older adults may have both medical and psychiatric disorders in addition to taking medications, it’s critical that an expert be able to distinguish multiple disorders and  evaluate the presence of ADHD accurately. Effective treatment is completely dependent on the accuracy of the diagnosis.
Thank you for your interest.
David W. Goodman, M.D.

Dr. David W. Goodman quoted in The New York Times Today (December 15, 2013)


Today the New York Times published an article “The Selling of  Attention Deficit Disorder” by Alan Schwarz. This is a lengthy article highlighting the increased identification of people with ADHD and  the concomitant increase in the prescriptions of effective medications.  The article is a feature story on the New York Times website today.

Toward the end of this article I am  quoted for the authorship of a continuing medical education article I wrote for Medscape.com in August 2012. In the Times article, he references a six-minute video clip of an interview between physician and patient I had included in my Medscape article.  He uses my quote “That was not an acceptable way to evaluate and conclude that the patient has A.D.H.D.” to  indict me for using  the short video as an example of how to evaluate adult ADHD. He sat with me for 30 minutes in Washington DC and recorded our interview.  However, what he failed to mention in his New York Times article was that the video clip he referenced accompanied a 2000 word continuing medical education article with 86 scientific references that was estimated to take physicians 2.5 hours to complete.  It would appear that Mr. Swartz had an a priori agenda in presenting his information. His remarks in the article malign and misrepresents physicians’ and researchers’ commitment to exploring causes and effective treatments for ADHD.  Unfortunately this is not my first experience with journalists dispensing with facts that don’t support their biased premise.

This evening I composed my  Letter to the editor and have forwarded it to them.   Let’s wait and see what develops. And now you have the back story to my quote.  Thank you for your interest.

David W. Goodman M.D.

 

Generic Cymbalta to be available very soon


The FDA recently approved of the generic versions of Cymbalta and this is approval takes effect today. The generic will be manufactured by five different generic pharmaceutical companies. It is important for patients taking this medication to understand the generic bioequivalence have a range of 80 – 120% of the brand bioavailability. While the transition from a brand to generic formulation often occurs without relapse, occasionally some patients may notice a decline in the effectiveness of the medication with a change to generic. It’s best to carefully monitor your symptoms and side effects during the first month of transition from brand formulation to a generic preparation.

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